Travel aims a.k.a. what am I doing with my life?

I’ve already written a bit about my reasons for travelling in my article on “voluntourism” and gap year travel, but here’s a rundown for those of you who aren’t sure. Please note that the fact that I gripe on about my problems a little in no way means that I’m not aware of just how insignificant they are in the grand scheme of things, and how lucky I am compared to most.

Thoughtful pose?
Thoughtful pose?

Continue reading “Travel aims a.k.a. what am I doing with my life?”

Voluntourism and the ‘gap yah’ stereotype; young people and the Western saviour complex

I’ve already mentioned how aware I am that sometimes, to those who don’t know much about what I’m doing and why I’m travelling, I could be viewed as just one of the hordes of young people on a gap year to ‘find themselves’ through travel. Maybe I am.

Such a stereotype! It’s one I am definitely familiar with, as many students at my university seem to have already taken a “gap yah”, so called in a mockery of the “rah” accent and background of the typical Exeter student; well off, middle class and privately educated. I assure you that despite falling into the fairly loose “middle-class” category, I am neither rich nor public-schooled. My parents have always made it clear that they will support me, but we don’t have money to throw around, and I am always conscious of my spending. I attended several run-of-the-mill comprehensive schools, and a state college.

So I perhaps don’t quite fit the “Exetah” stereotype, but as far as being a white, middle-class, “Oxbridge-almost” (that’s another story), lacking a regional accent, I suppose I fit some of the criteria. Not to turn this into some kind of tale about what a special snowflake I am, and how I’m not like other people. I am simply writing this to talk about my own feelings on this stereotype and what we can do to dispel it. Continue reading “Voluntourism and the ‘gap yah’ stereotype; young people and the Western saviour complex”